Natural Easter Egg Dyes DIY Recipes

Homemade Natural Easter Egg Dyes DIY Recipes

Homemade Natural Easter Egg Dyes | DIY Recipes

DIY Recipes

This spring time I decided to try natural Easter egg dyes DIY recipes. I found ideas for natural dye recipes from About.com and Wholefoods Market. Some of these fruit, vegetable, and spice dyes work better than others. I tested them out, so you will know which ones result in beautifully dyed Easter eggs and which ones to skip.

Natural Alternative to

Making your own do-it-yourself Easter egg dyes is a natural alternative to purchasing an egg dyeing kit made with artificial colors.

Health Benefits

The safety of artificial food colorings is up for debate. Out of 80 synthetic dyes originally used in the U.S., only 15 were still legal by 1938 and only 7 remain on the FDA’s approved list today (FD&C Blue No. 1,  FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3,  FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6).1

As a child, I would use an artificial Easter egg dyeing kit from the grocery store. I also loved coloring cookies and frosting with little bottles of food coloring. But after learning that artificial food coloring is derived from coal tar and could potentially be harmful to our health, I decided to start using only natural food colorings. I would rather stay on the safe side, in case it turns out that artificial food colorings are linked to cancer, allergies, and hyperactivity.2

Tools

  • Egg carton for drying dyed eggs
  • Small bowls or cups for soaking eggs in dye
  • Spoon or wire ladle for removing eggs from dye
  • Pan for boiling eggs
  • Pan for boiling dyes

Steps

Boiled Eggs

  1. Place 12 or more eggs in a pan and cover eggs with water.
  2. Gently boil for 30 minutes.
  3. Allow water to cool before emptying the pan.

Dyes

  1. Add water and coloring substance to a sauce pan
  2. Bring to a boil
  3. Reduce heat and simmer partially covered for 20-30 minutes
  4. Allow to cool
  5. Pour liquid into a small bowl or cup, straining out chunks of vegetables or berries
  6. Mix in white vinegar
  7. Soak eggs until desired shade is reached. If eggs are only partially submerged, rotate often.
  8. Remove with a spoon or wire ladle and allow eggs to fully dry in an egg carton.
  9. Refrigerate eggs once the dye has dried.
Natural Dyes- Red Cabbage, Turmeric, Blueberries

Natural Dyes- Red Cabbage, Turmeric, Blueberries

Drying Naturally Colored Eggs

Drying Naturally Colored Eggs

Natural Easter Egg Dyes

Natural Easter Egg Dyes DIY Recipes

Natural Easter Egg Dyes DIY Recipes

With the following recipes you can soak 3-4 eggs in one color dye at a time. Make sure eggs are fully submerged, or rotate frequently. You can easily double this recipe, depending upon how many eggs you would like to dye at a time.

Natural Blue Easter Egg Dye

Natural Blue Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Natural Blue Easter Egg Dye Recipe

My favorite is the natural blue Easter egg dye! I used red (purple) cabbage and the eggs came out a precious light blue, similar to a Robbin’s egg.

  • 2 Cups red cabbage (sliced)
  • 2 Cups water
  • 1 tsp white vinegar

Natural Yellow Easter Egg Dye

Natural Yellow Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Natural Yellow Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Turmeric dyes the eggs a gorgeous bright yellow and leaves a spicy scent.

  • 2 Cups water
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp white vinegar

Natural Green Easter Egg Dye

Natural Green Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Natural Green Easter Egg Dye Recipe

I tried multiple approaches before successfully achieving a green Easter egg dye. I tried boiling baby spinach twice, but only ended up with slightly yellow water. (I was also unsuccessful at making orange colored dye using baby carrots, so perhaps baby versions of vegetables do not work as well.)

To make a natural green dye I also tried mixing red cabbage and turmeric together and boiling them, but that just resulted in blue liquid and yellow cabbage!

The best method for obtaining a spring green is the simplest. First dye the egg yellow with turmeric dye. Allow it to fully dry. Then soak the egg in blue dye made from cabbage.

  • Natural yellow dye, then
  • Natural blue dye

Natural Purple Easter Egg Dye

Natural Purple Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Natural Purple Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Dye made from frozen blueberries resulted in an uneven blue to purple color across the eggs. Using fresh blueberries or straining the boiled berries through a cheese cloth might work better.

  • 2 Cups blueberries
  • 2 Cups water
  • 1 tsp white vinegar

You could also get purple eggs by soaking them first in natural blue dye and second in natural pink dye.

Natural Pink Easter Egg Dye

Natural Pink Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Natural Pink Easter Egg Dye Recipe

I tried all sorts of methods before achieving success with a natural pink dye. First I tried using beet powder, but it only imparted a tiny amount of color onto the egg.

Next I used boiled red onion skins, but that dyed the egg brown (see recipe below).

I then tried boiling frozen raspberries. Although the raspberries turned into a delicious smelling sauce, they did not dye the eggs. Any vegetable or berry is probably best used in its fresh form, when it retains more color.

I also tried soaking boiled eggs in wine (no need to boil the wine). The eggs ended up with an interesting green and purple tie-dye effect, but not pink or red.

I finally created a natural pink dye using fresh beets.

  • 4 Beets (chopped)
  • 2 Cups water
  • 1 tsp white vinegar

Natural Brown Easter Egg Dye

Natural Brown Easter Egg Dye Recipe

Natural Brown Easter Egg Dye Recipe

I had read that red onion skins would make a red dye, but for me they turned the egg a greyish brown color.

  • Outer dry skin from 2 red onions
  • 2 Cups water
  • 1 tsp white vinegar

Tasty Meals

After separating out the pieces of cooked beets and cabbage from the liquid, you can mix the vegetables together in a tasty soup or stew, and top with a dollop of Greek Yogurt. Nothing goes to waste! If you are looking for a way to use up some of your Easter eggs, try making vegetarian Cobb salad.

Have you used natural Easter egg dye recipes before? What is your favorite fruit, vegetable or spice for making dye?

Are you inspired to try natural DIY Easter egg dye this year?

Show 2 footnotes

  1. Living in Color: The Potential Dangers of Artificial Dyes, Forbes, http://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelhennessey/2012/08/27/living-in-color-the-potential-dangers-of-artificial-dyes/
  2. The Case Against Artificial Food Colorings: Should you be concerned?, The Daily Green, http://www.thedailygreen.com/healthy-eating/eat-safe/artificial-food-colorings-health-effects

About the Author:

Heidi Avelino is constantly searching for ways to live a natural and eco friendly lifestyle. From switching to safe natural beauty products to embracing natural parenting methods. Follow along for the latest on natural products, DIY recipes, natural foods, and natural parenting. Aloha!

5 Comments on "Natural Easter Egg Dyes DIY Recipes"

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  1. Michelle says:

    Thank you so much for figuring this out! We were wondering how to have a healthier Easter egg hunt, and are really looking forward to it. Have you found a way to design the eggs once colored?

    • Heidi Avelino says:

      I’m glad to hear that you are going to try this natural method of dyeing eggs! There are ways to add designs to the eggs before dyeing them. You can wrap rubber bands around the eggs. Or you could draw designs on them with clear crayons. One year we decorated eggs by dipping the entire egg in melted clear wax. Then we etched out the designs with a needle and then dyed them to add color.

Comments are welcome!